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I just noticed how the Where Were You When... quiz is a whole bunch… 
12th-Jan-2003 01:19 am
toyz
I just noticed how the Where Were You When... quiz is a whole bunch of late-80s and 90s events plus the JFK assassination. That's a rather dead giveaway that it was written by some Gen-Y kid who just threw in the JFK thing to catch the Old People. (I'll also guess it was a PNW person, since the Nisqually quake wasn't really national news).

I mean, c'mon. What about

13. The Apollo 11 moon landing (7/20/1969)
We were vacationing at my great aunt's cottage on Lake Michigan near Ludington. Her TV barely worked; the sound was sortof ok, but the picture kept going out. Very, very, very annoying.
14. Phase One (8/15/1971)
A Republican president announces wage and price controls to tame a "runaway" inflation rate of 4.5%. If you thought the stink over GHWBSr violating his silly "read my lips no new taxes" pledge was bad, that was nothing compared to this. And of course, little did they know what was coming (inflation got to 13% in 1980). My dad was incredibly pissed; he'd been overdue for a raise for quite some time.
15. The fall of Allende (9/11/1973)
Well all right, this was a big deal for us because my dad grew up in Chile, my grandparents had just "escaped" a few months earlier, and my uncle was a senior executive at a copper mining company whose assets there has just been nationalized. Lots of phone calls. We all breathed a sigh of relief that Chile wasn't going to be lost to the Communists like Cuba.
My uncle later had this 'funny' story about having to fly down to Miami in the middle of the night to deliver a special suitcase to some random people; naturally, he didn't dare look inside it.
16. The Yom Kippur attack (10/6/1973)
My 7th grade social studies teacher (yes, she was Jewish) was completely devastated. We all sat around in class in stunned silence that morning, figuring Israel was toast. I didn't find out about Nixon pulling the covers off the silos (when the Soviets threatened to intervene to save the Egyptian army) until years later.
17. Nixon announcing his resignation (8/8/1974)
It was horrifying; there was such foul language on those tapes. Politicians weren't supposed to talk like that. No, really.
18. The fall of Saigon (4/29/1975)
Glued to the TV, you better believe it.
19. The takeover of the US embassy in Iran (11/4/1979)
This was a big deal, too, but I don't remember where I was for it (aside from being a college freshman). Though once Cronkite hit on the idea of ending every broadcast with "and so ends the <n>-th day of the captivity of the American hostages in Iran", I knew then that Carter was finished.
20. Outbreak of the First Gulf War (9/22/1980)
I happened to be taking a politics course that semester (silly distributive requirements): International Relations. The instructor was something of a specialist on the Middle East. He was sure it would all be over in a few weeks.
Comments 
12th-Jan-2003 01:32 pm (UTC) - Yeah, but...
...who cares about old fogey crap like that, anyway?

^_^

I don't know where it was written, but the person I got it from is in New York State! And she remembered, so it must have gotten some notice. On the other hand, the quiz did name it correctly, but it got the California quake wrong, so that does point back up here. So!

That's a lot of words to use to say NOTHING, innit? W00t!
12th-Jan-2003 02:18 pm (UTC) - Re: Yeah, but...
That's a lot of words to use to say NOTHING, innit?
You didn't say NOTHING, you said, "I don't give a shit." There's a difference.

Also was your friend in New York state actually from New York? Or did she move there from here? I mean I'm technically in Washington state, but if it were me I could have easily put in things like The Mianus River Bridge Collapse (6/28/1983), because well, Connecticut; I've been over that bridge.
12th-Jan-2003 03:16 pm (UTC) - Re: Yeah, but...
<giggles> You really need to relax! That was a joke.

She is from NY state. Her parents live there, too. She went to school with me at Deerfield - two years younger - and has spent most of the time lately back upstate. (She owns/runs a small ISP up there as a part-time job, and also does some other things.)

As far as I know, she's never been out here.
12th-Jan-2003 06:26 pm (UTC)
It's more a Gen X thing, actually. Gen Y wouldn't remember Mt. St. Helens or the Challenger disaster.

As to your fogey quiz:

13. The Apollo 11 moon landing (7/20/1969)

The fetal pre-me was in utero at 5 months gestation or so, as my mom and dad signed on a new house and watched the footage on TV, or so I hear.

14. Phase One (8/15/1971)
A Republican president announces wage and price controls to tame a "runaway" inflation rate of 4.5%.

gaa gaah goo goo dada mama (21 months old)

15. The fall of Allende (9/11/1973)

Somewhere between potty trained and preschool.

16. The Yom Kippur attack (10/6/1973)

See previous.

17. Nixon announcing his resignation (8/8/1974)

Still a year away from kindergarten. I was too young to understand who the president was.

18. The fall of Saigon (4/29/1975)

Being raised by hippies. Still not in kindergarten.


19. The takeover of the US embassy in Iran (11/4/1979)

Almost ten. This is when I started watching and paying attention to TV news regularly (though I did also watch various speeches by Carter in the previous few years). I was one of two people in 4th grade who could spell "Ayatollah Khomeini." This was the first major news story aside from the 1976 election that I can remember (unless you count various happenings during Carter's administration, like the "killer rabbit" story, or anything about Amy or Billy Carter.) I probably first saw the news about this in the TV room on the second floor of our log house in Gig Harbor. The TV was later moved downstairs to the main living room, but I distinctly remember watching major news event of this period in that room, which later became my stepdad's office/den.

20. Outbreak of the First Gulf War (9/22/1980)

No clue. I'm pretty sure I saw that event as just an extension of the Hostage Crisis (how very American-centric of me) at the time.
12th-Jan-2003 07:23 pm (UTC)
It's more a Gen X thing, actually. Gen Y wouldn't remember Mt. St. Helens or the Challenger disaster
It's all pretty ill-defined. I mean Copeland's original definition (the lost generation between the baby-boomers and their kids, born 1959-65 or thereabouts) has me being "Generation X". And then the media kept revising it forward so that it was always the current generation of twenty-somethings.

It still annoys me that, as a result, there's no easy terminology for People Who Grew Up in the 70s.
12th-Jan-2003 10:49 pm (UTC)
I always (quite arbitrarily) thought of Generation X this way: If you think of the true Baby Boomers as being those born 1945-1955 (within ten years of the end of WWII) who came of age in the "cultural 60s," then you had the next generation between 1955-1965 (yours, presumably) that came of age in the 70s and early 80s, and Generation X the ten years from 1965 and 1975.

Since generational shifts don't tend to map nicely to decades, the other way of looking at Generation X is anyone born after the assassination of Kennedy but before the end of the Vietnam War. Basically, people born in the cultural 60s as opposed to the chronological 60s. That puts me, born in 1969, smack in the middle of the group.

To define your generation similarly, you'd have to come up with an appropriate beginning date. Maybe the release of the first Elvis record? And you came of age in the punk, disco, and new wave era. The Blank Generation.

The next group (Gen Y) would be those born after Vietnam but before the end of the Cold War (though that's a bit longer than some of the other generations--vaguely, the Reagan-era kids.) Which means at this point we really should be talking about Generation Z--those born between the end of the Cold War but before September 11.

Of course, these generations are shorter than actual generations in the familial sense, but I think that gives a better picture. New generations tend to gain their popular cultural and historical references from two sources--their parents (two cultural generations before them) and from the people who grew up just before them (one cultural generation). So for me, both the 60s generation and the punk generation were influential to me as I grew up.

It's all pretty silly, since it's just a way to label diverse groups of people who really don't have much in common. But that's how I think of it, anyway.

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